Center for Contemporary Arab Studies - Center for Contemporary Arab Studies | Georgetown University

Center for Contemporary Arab Studies

The Center for Contemporary Arab Studies (CCAS) at Georgetown University directs the nation’s only Master of Arts in Arab Studies (MAAS) program. Our rigorous Arabic language training and multidisciplinary approach draw on the expertise of an academically diverse faculty. CCAS also hosts a rich calendar of public events, a Department of Education Title VI-supported outreach program for K-14 educators, and a growing multimedia and publications program.

CCAS News:

Inauguration of the Clovis and Hala Salaam Maksoud Chair in Arab Studies Draws Hundreds

Inauguration of the Clovis and Hala Salaam Maksoud Chair in Arab Studies Draws Hundreds

A standing-room-only audience attended the inauguration of the Clovis and Hala Salaam Maksoud Chair in Arab Studies on October 23rd. The evening event introduced Dr. Fida J. Adely, the first holder of the Chair established by friends of the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies in honor of Ambassador Clovis Masoud and his late wife Hala Salaam Maksoud. Robert L. Gallucci, dean of the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, served as the Master of Ceremonies for the inauguration. Rev. Timothy S. Godfrey, S.J., director of Campus Ministry, gave the invocation. Dr. Michael C. Hudson, CCAS director, gave the opening address, followed by some moving remarks by Ambassador Maksoud, founder and director of the Center for the Global South at American University. Ambassador Maksoud recalled the commitment of his late wife, Dr. Hala Maksoud, to human rights, women's development, and a productive and rich dialogue between the Arab world and the West. Dr. Adely then delivered an incisive and detailed critical presentation entitled "Education for Development in the Arab World: Progress, Dilemmas, and Choices." Drawing on her doctoral field research on gender and education in Jordan, which she conducted under a Fulbright scholarship, Adely employed qualitative data to critique recent quantitative surveys concerning women's development in the Arab World. Adely, who holds a doctorate in comparative education and anthropology from Teachers College, Columbia University, drew ...
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Dr. Sherene Seikaly Named the 2007-2008 Qatar Post-Doctoral Fellow at CCAS

Dr. Sherene Seikaly has been named the 2007-2008 Qatar Post-Doctoral Fellow at Georgetown University's Center for Contemporary Arab Studies. She is also the co-editor of the Arab Studies Journal. Dr. Seikaly received her doctoral degree in September 2007 from the Departments of History and Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies at New York University. Her dissertation, Meatless Days: Consumption and Capitalism in Wartime Palestine 1939-1948, offers the first concerted examination of the Palestinian Arab middle class under the British Mandate (1918-1948). Situated at the intersections of studies of consumption, political economy, and colonialism, her research traces the formation of a Palestinian Arab middle class before the defining rupture of 1948, when Palestinian Arabs became either refugees or second-class citizens. Dominant historical accounts of the mandate period depict Palestinian Arab society as divided between poor, illiterate masses of peasants and workers and a small group of venal notables engaged in internecine competition. Meatless Days disrupts this flattened topography of Palestinian social life by focusing on Palestinian Arab businessmen and their efforts to mediate between Arab society and the colonial state alongside unprecedented government interventions in everyday life during World War II. Through an examination of quotidian business and consumer languages and practices, her work unsettles long-held assumptions about 1940s Palestine as a period of political paralysis and stagnation. By exploring varied experience of markets and commodities as ...
A New Year, and New Faces, at CCAS

A New Year, and New Faces, at CCAS

The offices and common areas of the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies are once again abuzz with students, faculty and staff now that the 2007-08 academic year is in full swing. CCAS welcomes 31 new MAAS students this fall -- the largest-ever incoming class. This academic year also sees the return of Dr. Michael Hudson, Saif Ghobash Professor of Arab Studies, to the CCAS directorship. CCAS has bid farewell to staff members and welcomed their replacements over the last two months. Dr. Laurie King-Irani stepped into the position of Multimedia and Publications Editor in August as Laila Shereen Sakr left Washington, DC to pursue an innovative graduate degree in multimedia theory and design at UC-Santa Cruz. Formerly an adjunct professor in the MAAS program, King-Irani holds a PhD in Social Anthropology and Middle Eastern Studies from Indiana University-Bloomington (2001). She is a former editor of Middle East Report, and has edited and produced web and print publications in Lebanon, Canada, and the United States. Ms. Hala Shah joined CCAS as Information Officer in September 2007 following Greg Kruzcek's departure for Lebanon, where he is pursuing graduate studies in International Relations at the American University of Beirut. Ms. Shah holds a BA in Journalism from New York University, with a Minor in Middle Eastern Studies. She previously served as the president and editor of Aftab Magazine ...
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CCAS Announces Appointment of Dr. Fida Adely as First Holder of the Maksoud Chair in Arab Studies

Georgetown University’s Center for Contemporary Arab Studies (CCAS) has announced the appointment of Dr. Fida Adely as the first holder of the Clovis and Hala Salaam Maksoud Chair in Arab Studies. Starting this fall, Dr. Adely will teach courses on development, gender, and education in the Arab world as part of the Master of Arts in Arab Studies program. “This is a most welcome addition to our capabilities in Arab studies,” said Dr. Michael Hudson, Saif Ghobash Professor of Arab Studies and director of CCAS. “It gives the opportunity to our faculty and students to confront the myriad challenges facing Arab societies in these turbulent times.” The Maksoud Chair, established by CCAS in honor of Ambassador Clovis Maksoud and his late wife Dr. Hala Salaam Maksoud to strengthen research and teaching in the areas of social and economic development in the Arab world, will contribute to research and teaching in the broad area of Arab social and economic development, including issues of education, governance and gender. Fida Adely comes to Georgetown with significant expertise in the field of development and gender in the Arab world. She was the recipient of two Fulbright fellowships to study gender and education in Jordan, where her research examined the role of state schools in processes of contemporary social change. She received her PhD in comparative education and anthropology from ...
Making Hummos bi Tahini in School

Making Hummos bi Tahini in School

Hummos is the word for chick peas in Arabic. Hummos bi Tahini means chick peas with tahini. Tahini is sesame seeds ground up into a paste; it is available at Middle Eastern food stores and at many supermarkets. Be sure to mix tahini well before adding, as the solids in it tend to settle to the bottom of the jar if it is not used often. What you will need: Utensils one can opener one large bowl one large spoon one rubber spatula ¼ cup measure ½ teaspoon measure ¼ teaspoon measure knife to cut lemon in half lemon juicer 3 sandwich size zipper-locking plastic bags one shallow dish or smaller bowl in which to serve the Hummos Ingredients one can (15.5 ozs.) chick peas ¼ cup water one medium size lemon (about ¼ cup juice) ¾ teaspoon salt ¼ cup tahini paprika for garnishing 3 loaves Arabic bread, cut up (to scoop the Hummos) How to Make Hummos bi Tahini: 1. Open the can of chick peas. 2. Drain can of the liquid inside. 3. Remove 9 whole chick peas and set aside (for garnishing later). 4. Divide the remaining chick peas into 3 portions and place each portion in a sandwich size zipper-locking plastic bag. Zip each bag closed (make sure there is no air left). 5. Mash the peas in the bag ...