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Event Celebrating Naguib Mahfouz’s Work

Join the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies, in collaboration with the Egyptian Embassy in Washington DC, the American University in Cairo, Georgetown University’s Lannan Literary Programs of the Department of English, Georgetown University’s Department of Arabic and Islamic Studies, and the Georgetown University Library to celebrate the life and work of Egyptian author and Nobel Prize-winner Naguib Mahfouz

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One Student’s Experience in Qatar

Qatar is not a tropical fruit. It’s not a musical instrument, and it has nothing to do with sewage systems. And if you take into account how active the country is these days in international affairs, education, the organization of conferences and international sporting events, it is truly shameful that not more people have heard of it.

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Drs. Stephen Walt and John Mearsheimer Present Working Paper

On Wednesday, September 20th, the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies hosted Professors Stephen Walt and John Mearsheimer as they presented their recent working paper, “The Israel Lobby and US Foreign Policy.” The presentation was moderated by Dean Emeritus Peter Krogh of Georgetown’s School of Foreign Service.

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Ambassador Dobbins calls for greater nuance in foreign policy

On September 28th, 2006 the Honorable James F. Dobbins gave a lecture in the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies entitled, “Moral Clarity & the Middle East: Longer, Wider War, or Peace?” Former Ambassador Dobbins, a graduate of Georgetown’s School of Foreign Service, spoke on the necessity of international cooperation in nation building and the historical lessons to be found in previous attempts at post-war reconstruction by the United States. Ambassador Dobbins opened the lecture with a reminder of the broad international support that the United States enjoyed for its foreign policy following both Iraq’s invasion of Kuwait and the American intervention against the Taliban immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks. He contrasted this with the standing of world opinion now, what this means for the prospect of a successful Iraqi reconstruction, and the status of Afghanistan before and after the invasion of Iraq. According to Amb. Dobbins, the initial success against the Taliban and the quick progress made towards establishing a viable democracy for Afghanistan were the combined result of an indigenous resistance movement already in place and a shared interest among Afghanistan’s neighbors in the replacement of the Taliban regime with a democratic government. He listed the contributions of the Iranian government to the reconstruction process as particularly significant; he noted that this cooperation ended after the “Axis of Evil” State of the Union address in 2002. Moving on to Iraq, Amb. Dobbins noted that the foreign policy statements and actions of the Bush administration caused the international community to shy away from fully supporting Iraqi reconstruction. Thus the nation with the most experience in stability operations achieved only poor results, a result that he stated was caused by a calculated ignorance on the part of the reconstruction’s planners. Instead of looking to the American occupation of Germany and Japan post-World War II, he indicated that better historical tests of the nation-building effort would have been the interventions in Bosnia and Kosovo. Purposeful ignorance of these historical precedents, neighboring countries that are distrustful of our aims, and a martial foreign policy language that hinders policy options are, according to Ambassador Dobbins, the chief hindrances to a successful nation-building effort in Iraq. Before taking questions from the attendees, he closed with this message: “What our diplomacy needs is a little more nuance and a little less certainty, a little more sophistication and a little less simplicity, a little more cooption and a little less coercion, a little more realism and a little less faith.”

On September 28th, 2006 the Honorable James F. Dobbins gave a lecture in the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies entitled, “Moral Clarity & the Middle East: Longer, Wider War, or Peace?” Former Ambassador Dobbins, a graduate of Georgetown’s School of Foreign Service, spoke on the necessity of international cooperation in nation building and the historical lessons to be found in previous attempts at post-war reconstruction by the United States.

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CCAS Offers Grants and Study Opportunities

Interested in deepening or sharing your knowledge of the Arab world? The Center for Contemporary Arab Studies is pleased to offer a range of scholarships, fellowships, and awards to Georgetown and non-Georgetown academics who are interested in Arab studies.

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Revolutionary Art

My introduction to the Arab world took place in 1974 when, as a 25 year-old Peace Corps volunteer, I was sent to teach welding, masonry and other technical subjects at a new vocational training school established by the Moroccan government in Bab Kechich, a working class neighborhood in Marrakech’s old city.

Ottoman Caligraphy

The Pen is Mightier than the Sword

One of the sessions at the annual summer workshop for teachers this past June featured a “webquest” titled, “Mightier than the Sword: Calligraphy of the 16th Century Imperial Courts.” The speaker was Sophia Husain, an English teacher at Wakefield High School (Arlington, VA), who developed this resource under the direction of the Jerusalem Fund for Education and Community Development.

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D.C. Students Travel to Egypt

On April 20, 2006, a group of students from DC Public Schools found themselves standing before the massive industrial printing presses of Al Ahram Newspaper Company in Cairo, Egypt. The students were told that in that room, some hundreds of thousands of Arabic and English script newspapers were printed and eventually distributed to millions of readers in Egypt and the greater Middle East.