Gendered Paradoxes: Educating Jordanian Women in Nation, Faith, and Progress

Fida Adely Gendered Paradoxes 2   

Fida J. Adely

University of Chicago, 2012

In Gendered Paradoxes: Educating Jordanian Women in Nation, Faith, and Progress, Fida Adely takes readers into the halls of a Jordanian public school—the al-Khatwa High School for Girls—to examine how the young women there are facing the great social and economic challenges of today's Jordan. The demographic picture in Jordan—with highly educated women largely remaining outside the formal job market for most of their adult lives—prompted the World Bank in 2005 to label the country a "gendered paradox," but Adely argues that this assessment is a fallacy. Showing that the important place of education in Jordan should not be calculated soley through an employment lens, she raises fundamental questions about what constitutes development, progress, and empowerment, not just for the girls of al-Khatwa High School but for women throughout the Middle East.

To read an interview of Dr. Adely about her book, see this article in the CCAS Featured Stories Archive.